A Political Biography of Maharaja Ripudaman Singh of Nabha

Paramountcy, Patriotism, and the Panth

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ISBN:

9780199481354

Publication date:

09/02/2018

Hardback

378 pages

We sell our titles through other companies
Disclaimer :You will be redirected to a third party website.The sole responsibility of supplies, condition of the product, availability of stock, date of delivery, mode of payment will be as promised by the said third party only. Prices and specifications may vary from the OUP India site.

ISBN:

9780199481354

Publication date:

09/02/2018

Hardback

378 pages

J.S. Grewal and Indu Banga

Maharaja Ripudaman Singh of Nabha (1883–1942) was an exceptional ruler, a princely ‘rebel’ who resisted the paramount power in different ways. Forced to abdicate in 1923 ostensibly on account of ‘maladministration’, Ripudaman Singh was sent to Kodaikanal in 1928, where he died after 14 years in captivity without any recourse to judicial appeal.
Set against the backdrop of Indian nationalism, Sikh resurgence, and British paramountcy, J.S. Grewal and Indu Banga trace the Maharaja’s political career, revealing the devious ways in which the paramount power dealt with traditional nobility.

Rights:  World Rights

J.S. Grewal and Indu Banga

Description

Maharaja Ripudaman Singh of Nabha (1883–1942) was an exceptional ruler, a princely ‘rebel’ who resisted the paramount power in different ways. Forced to abdicate in 1923 ostensibly on account of ‘maladministration’, Ripudaman Singh was sent to Kodaikanal in 1928, where he died after 14 years in captivity without any recourse to judicial appeal.
Set against the backdrop of Indian nationalism, Sikh resurgence, and British paramountcy, J.S. Grewal and Indu Banga trace the Maharaja’s political career, revealing the devious ways in which the paramount power dealt with traditional nobility. They explore his career, education, and upbringing to explain his ideological stance, appreciation for Indian nationalism, and his active involvement in the Sikh reformist movement.
Moved by Panthic and nationalist concerns, the Maharaja of Nabha bridged ‘Indian India’ and British India through the concerns he affirmed, reforms he introduced, and the causes he espoused as a patriot.

About the Authors
J.S. Grewal
is former professor and vice chancellor of Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India, and director and later chairman of the Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla, India.
Indu Banga is professor emerita of history, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India, and was professor of history at Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India, from 1982 to 1990.

J.S. Grewal and Indu Banga

Table of contents


List of Illustrations
Preface
Introduction: Paramountcy and Its Historiography
1. A Mixed Heritage
2. Tikka Ripudaman Singh
3. Installation and Investiture
4. The Maharaja, Michael O’Dwyer, and the World War
5. Government and Politics
6. Government Prepares Grounds for Deposition
7. Removal from Nabha under Duress
8. Issue of Restoration and the Jaito Morcha
9. Attitude of the Congress and Its Leaders
10. Defi ance and Deposition
11. The Indictment of Patiala Turned into an Indictment of Nabha
12. The Maharaja Loses Custody of the Tikka
13. The Nabha Issue in the House of Commons
14. Last Bid and the Last Days
In Retrospect
Maharaja Ripudaman Singh in Photographs
Glossary
Select Bibliography
Index
About the Authors

J.S. Grewal and Indu Banga

J.S. Grewal and Indu Banga

J.S. Grewal and Indu Banga

Description

Maharaja Ripudaman Singh of Nabha (1883–1942) was an exceptional ruler, a princely ‘rebel’ who resisted the paramount power in different ways. Forced to abdicate in 1923 ostensibly on account of ‘maladministration’, Ripudaman Singh was sent to Kodaikanal in 1928, where he died after 14 years in captivity without any recourse to judicial appeal.
Set against the backdrop of Indian nationalism, Sikh resurgence, and British paramountcy, J.S. Grewal and Indu Banga trace the Maharaja’s political career, revealing the devious ways in which the paramount power dealt with traditional nobility. They explore his career, education, and upbringing to explain his ideological stance, appreciation for Indian nationalism, and his active involvement in the Sikh reformist movement.
Moved by Panthic and nationalist concerns, the Maharaja of Nabha bridged ‘Indian India’ and British India through the concerns he affirmed, reforms he introduced, and the causes he espoused as a patriot.

About the Authors
J.S. Grewal
is former professor and vice chancellor of Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India, and director and later chairman of the Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Shimla, India.
Indu Banga is professor emerita of history, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India, and was professor of history at Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India, from 1982 to 1990.

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Table of contents


List of Illustrations
Preface
Introduction: Paramountcy and Its Historiography
1. A Mixed Heritage
2. Tikka Ripudaman Singh
3. Installation and Investiture
4. The Maharaja, Michael O’Dwyer, and the World War
5. Government and Politics
6. Government Prepares Grounds for Deposition
7. Removal from Nabha under Duress
8. Issue of Restoration and the Jaito Morcha
9. Attitude of the Congress and Its Leaders
10. Defi ance and Deposition
11. The Indictment of Patiala Turned into an Indictment of Nabha
12. The Maharaja Loses Custody of the Tikka
13. The Nabha Issue in the House of Commons
14. Last Bid and the Last Days
In Retrospect
Maharaja Ripudaman Singh in Photographs
Glossary
Select Bibliography
Index
About the Authors

Read More